• Joshua Duvall

GovConJudicata Weekly Debrief (8/8–12)

This week's Weekly Debrief covers the Army's hunt for soldier-connected technology, MDA's priorities, NOAA's need for satellite data, Senators urge the use of debarment on fraudsters, and FOIA enforcement.


Defense


NextGov – The U.S. Army Is Hunting For More Soldier-Connected Tech

  • "The Army wants a small business to supply tech that can support and integrate everything from sensors to 5G and augmented reality headsets, in an effort to 'optimize the ground soldier’s ability to shoot, move, and communicate'"

DefenseNews – Missile Defense Agency priorities include hypersonics, Guam, Hill says

  • "Protecting the continental U.S. and Guam from missiles and hypersonic weapons are the top priorities for the Missile Defense Agency, Vice Adm. Jon Hill, the MDA director, said in an interview with Defense News."

NOAA


FedScoop – NOAA looks to improve satellite data availability, manage services with industry

  • "The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration seeks information on commercial space-based data relay capabilities that can improve satellite data availability and resilience. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) needs a more agile, scalable information system to process data, and its Commercial Services Integrated Product Team identified space-based data relays (SBDRs) as an emerging technology that might fill that need.

Congress


FCW – Senators urge DOJ to flex debarment authority

  • "According to two Democratic senators, the federal government is 'failing to use key tools in its arsenal against corporate criminals.' Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Ray Lujan (D-N.M.) urged top Department of Justice leaders to leverage suspension and debarment authorities against federal contractors who are found to have defrauded the government, who enter into settlements in civil cases or even who are suspected of misconduct based on a 'preponderance of the evidence.'"

Oversight


FedNewsNet – Does the government need a FOIA enforcer?

  • "A federal advisory committee is recommending Congress give a small office at the National Archives and Records Administration the ability to issue binding decisions over Freedom of Information Act request disputes. Proponents of the recommendation say it will help improve FOIA at a time when public records requests backlogs and denials are on the rise. But the idea also faces pushback, including from the office’s director."

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