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  • Writer's pictureJoshua Duvall

GovConJudicata Weekly Debrief (1/2–6)

This week's Weekly Debrief covers DLA's shifts to commercial software for warehouse management, shipyard optimization, COBOL, NOAA's edge computing and public consumers, and securing critical infrastructure.


Defense


  • "The Defense Department’s central agency for managing the military’s supply chain is modernizing its warehouse management technology and plans to move from government-built systems to commercial software."

  • "For the foreseeable future, the United States will not build more ships per year than China. That’s the reality we face as we enter a new maritime era. Our adversaries are devoting enormous resources to close the capability gap, and in order to maintain superiority, we must both build as fast as we can, and maximize the maritime power of our existing fleet."

IT Modernization


  • "If COBOL seems as antiquated as the manual typewriter, you’re thinking about it wrong, researchers say. The workhorse coding language developed in 1959 was built to process massive numbers of transactions in banking, retail, transportation and government programs such tax processing, Social Security and unemployment insurance."

NOAA


  • "The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration operates in mission spaces that extend from the bottom of the ocean to outside of Earth’s atmosphere. But fundamentally, it’s a data organization first and foremost. It deploys sensors in all those varied environments in order to gather data that can then be analyzed and packaged into products that help to protect citizens and industries from the volatility of the weather. Now, edge computing is making it possible to not only conduct more analysis of that data in the field, yielding more immediate insights, but also to better engage the community of stakeholders across academia, industry and the general public who are the primary consumers of NOAA’s data."

Cyber


  • "As cyberattacks become more sophisticated and dangerous, the threat to U.S. critical infrastructure increases by the day and puts national security, businesses and the public at risk."


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